Court did not kick-out Army, Youth, Workers MPs from Parliament

The Constitutional Court did not annul the election of legislators representing special interest groups in the 9th Parliament, the Deputy Attorney General, Hon. Mwesigwa Rukutana has clarified.


“It is not true that the Constitutional Court ruled that MPs for army, youth and workers are in Parliament illegally. The ruling does not affect existing MPs,” said Hon. Rukutana.

The Attorney General was responding to a concern raised by Hon. Milton Muwuma (NRM, Kigulu South), about Tuesday’s ruling in which the Constitutional Court declared as unconstitutional the laws used for the election of the army, youth and workers MPs. The ruling does not affect representatives of Persons With Disabilities.

Following the Court decision, media reports had suggested that the current MPs representing the army, youth and workers immediately lose and vacate their seats.

The Attorney General said that the Constitutional Court did not declare or order that the 2011 elections for special interest groups stand annulled, or that the effected representatives’ seats stand vacant.

Hon. Rukutana said, “Court made orders on the constitutionality of the laws for their elections.”

He said that government was dissatisfied with the Court’s ruling and was examining it with a view of appealing to a higher court. He said government had already filed its notice of appeal and will ask for a stay of execution of the ruling of the Constitutional Court.

Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Rt. Hon. Jacob Oulanyah, said Court had granted an injunction against the respondents who included the Electoral Commission using the current laws to carry out future elections for the army, youth and workers.

“There is no order directing sitting MPs (for special interest groups) to vacate their seats,” said Rt. Hon, Oulanyah.

He also said that Court’s ruling does not affect internal processes by political parties intending to field candidates for the said positions in next year’s elections.