September 17, 2013

Busoga Farmers in Bumper Harvest

Ginger farmers in Busoga region have recorded a bumper harvest following the adoption of the dug up method.  

The dug up method is convenient for farmers with small pieces of land. The farmer digs a pit and fills it with organic materials and animal waste, which he leaves to decompose. Later, the pit is filled with soft soil before the actual planting takes place.

Farmers inspect their dug up method modelled ginger gardens. Busoga farmers  have recorded a bumper harvest following the adoption of the dug up method.
Farmers inspect their dug up method modelled ginger gardens. Busoga farmers have recorded a bumper harvest following the adoption of the dug up method.

Louis Olunda, a farmer from Bugodi village in Mayuge is one of the farmers who have embraced the dug up method. Olunda says the method is simple and less time consuming.  According to Olunda he dug five pits last year, from which he has harvested seven tons of ginger. He says instead of using an acre of land to grow and harvest one ton of ginger, a farmer only needs to partition his garden into plots and dig up ditches of up to 15ft deep and 15 by 10 ft wide to get more ginger. Olunda says from a quarter of an acre of land he has earned 14 million shillings in 11 months.

Valerian Wakabaka, a ginger farmer from Kasokoso – Budoma village in Bukanga Sub County in Luuka district says the dug up ginger growing method takes less time adding that it is more profitable for farmers with small pieces of land. Wakabaka has three pits of ginger on his half acre piece of land. Despite having a variety of crops of his garden, Wakabaka says ginger is the most profitable.

Wakabaka says that he earns at least five million shillings from his three pits every year. A kilogram of ginger costs between 2000 to 2300 shillings in the garden.

Wakabaka says his ginger harvest is bought off before it matures because of high demand and fewer farmers involved in ginger growing. He attributes the bumper harvest to the good weather that prevailed throughout the season.

Paul Kigenyi, the Jinja district NAADS coordinator says they introduced dug up ginger farming method because of its profitability. A Kilogram of Ginger at Jinja Central and Kimaka fresh food markets costs 3500 shillings.

4 thoughts on “Busoga Farmers in Bumper Harvest

  1. This is great for Busoga. Such is what is needed not kyabazinga, a useless institution. Let NAADS and NARO come up with such high yield yet cheap agricutural methods to boast both food and cash crop production as opposed to fertilizers and tractors.

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