Transitions are tough, NRM Not Unique – Rwabwogo

President Museveni’s in-law Odrek Rwabwogo has said that transitions are tough and National Resistance Movement (NRM) is not unique in trying to cope up with these challenges.

Odrek at The National Resistance Movement Intergenerational Dialogue at Imperial Royale Hotel Tuesday evening.
Odrek at The National Resistance Movement Intergenerational Dialogue at Imperial Royale Hotel Tuesday evening.

Rwabwogo who was recently rejected by NRM Central Executive Committee (CEC) from contesting for the position of party Vice chairman for Western Uganda over inexperience said the decision was unfair but he accepted to step down.

“I know transitions are tough and the NRM is not unique in facing this situation. Many institutions world over have faced it with focus and faith and made it. I know the NRM will. But we got to start and show it by opening all the doors. I obviously recognize that transitions aren’t about individuals,” he said.

Adding; “In fact the reason I humbly stepped aside when I was unfairly stopped, was the recognition that the worthiness and weight of many is much better than the right and sanctity or even the pain of an individual. The whole is better than one part.”

He said that though there is a mixture of the old and the young in our government, it is not necessarily the kind of transition he aspires for.

Rwabwogo noted that he is looking forward to a deeper ideological transition that will allow a newer level of depth among leaders than NRM have so far had among the young people.

Sharing his campaign experience, he said ordinary people; Peasants, students, workers, women, and people with disabilities who shaped the movement struggle during the bush war now ask for transport refund, water and lunch before accepting to join party meeting.

He said that these people gave the NRM the much needed medicine, fighters and food at the Movement’s most vulnerable period, giving an example of people of Ngoma and Wakyaato in Nakaseke district who gave the Movement 21,000 heads of cattle in September 1983.

“That these people now no longer effectively participate in decision making to shape policy on critical issues such as agriculture, jobs and economy means we should go back to basics and ask ourselves the question every institution seeking longevity, eventually has to ask: What happened?” he asked.

Rwabwogo was speaking at The National Resistance Movement Intergenerational Dialogue at Imperial Royale Hotel Tuesday evening.

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