I am not Surprised with Supreme Court Ruling — Museveni

President Museveni has said he is not surprised by the Supreme Court ruling that upheld his victory in the 18th February presidential elections.

President elect, Yoweri Kaguta Museveni
President elect, Yoweri Kaguta Museveni

Museveni was declared winner of the election with more than 60 percent prompting Amama Mbabazi who came third to petition Supreme Court demanding annulment of the election.

In a unanimous ruling read by Chief Justice Bart Katurebe, the court ruled; “We hereby declare that the 1st (Museveni) respondent was validly elected as President in accordance with Article 104 of the Constitution and section 59 of the Presidential Elections Act. Accordingly, this petition is dismissed with no order as to costs.”

In a statement released yesterday evening, Museveni described judges as ‘reasonable men and women’ saying that that is how they became judges.

“I am not surprised, therefore, that they (judges) found that the General Elections held on 18th February reflected the will of the people of Uganda,” the statement reads.

“In fact, the NRM scored more votes but many of them were suppressed as invalid votes–almost 5% of the total votes cast. We did not bother to complain about this because we had enough votes to decisively win. Why inconvenience Ugandans with unnecessary altercation?” the statement added.

Museveni noted that the Supreme Court ruling “shows how institutions of the state have grown and recovered from the problems of the 1960s, 70s and early 1980s.”

Below is the full statement;

The lawyers normally talk of ‘reasonable men’ when referring to what people can believe or otherwise.

As the Monitor newspaper, not withstanding your nature, would realise, judges are ‘reasonable men and women’ plus, plus.

That is how they become judges in the first place. I am not surprised, therefore, that they found that the General Elections held on 18th February reflected the will of the people of Uganda.
In fact, the NRM scored more votes but many of them were suppressed as invalid votes–almost 5% of the total votes cast. We did not bother to complain about this because we had enough votes to decisively win. Why inconvenience Ugandans with unnecessary altercation?
It also shows how institutions of the state have grown and recovered from the problems of the 1960s, 70s and early 1980s.
I salute the people of Uganda and the state institutions of Uganda. I also salute the NRM fraternity for their efforts during the whole electorate cycle.