July 25, 2016

Gov’t Told To Invest In Performing Arts

Gov’t Told To Invest In Performing Arts


Uganda is neglecting the performing arts industry’s potential to drive economic activity, create jobs and contribute more to the tax base, says Steven Rwangyenzi , director Ndere cultural centre.

He says there are a lot of opportunities in performing Arts asking the youth to participate in it at a younger stage as opposed to engaging in it at an old age.

“I urge everyone to interest him/herself into performing arts. The government should fully support it to tap into its potential. There are a lot of opportunities, but people tend to engage in it at an older age,” said Steven Rwangyenzi.

He said Uganda is now known and admired for its beauty and cultural diversity which can be well brought out thorough performing arts as opposed to the days of former president Idi Amin Dada where it was known for being a hostile environment to foreigners especially the whites and Indians.

He made the call yesterday at Ashinaga Uganda offices in Nansana, Wakiso during the media launch of the oncoming, “At Home in the World” collaboration concert to be held on August 23rd at Ndere cultural centre –Kampala. The concert will be free of charge.

According to Yuka Yamada, the acting executive director Ashinaga Uganda, ‘At home in the world’ performance will combine Ugandan dance, Japanese Taiko drumming and choral singing, orchestrated by internationally renowned director John Caird.

Some of the beneficiaries under Ashinaga Africa Initiative pose for a group photo yesterday after the media launch at their offices in Nansana wakiso district.
Some of the beneficiaries under Ashinaga Africa Initiative pose for a group photo yesterday after the media launch at their offices in Nansana wakiso district.

 

She said performers will include Ugandan Ashinaga Rainbow house children; students from the Tohoku region devastated by the March 2011 earth quake and as well vasar college quoir.

“Though its young performers grew up in contrasting environment and cultures, ‘at home in the world’ brings them together through their shared passion for the arts. This unique cultural collaboration aims to raise awareness for the Ashinaga Africa initiative, which unites students from every sub-Saharan African country, “said, Yuka Yamada acting executive director Ashinaga Uganda.

To date, Ashinaga has provided $1 billion in educational aid to over 95,000 orphaned students in Japan, and its activities have extended to 50 countries worldwide.

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